río embudo birds

Identification Practice for the
Dixon Christmas Bird Count


Species Recorded in 15 out of the 16 Years of the Count.

[These species represent 9.6% of all individuals counted over the 16 years.]

See Suggested Exercises and other Information at Bottom of Page
 
English Name:
Genus species:
CommentsPhotos
Woodpeckers
Lewis’s Woodpecker
Melanerpes lewis


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External Sites:
Cornell
USGS
Image Search
A distinctive red-bellied, black-backed woodpecker.

White ring on neck and throat usually visible when perched or in flight.

Only woodpecker that "hawks" insects, making looping flights to catch insects before returning to the same perch.

El Bosque
Jays, Crows and their Allies
Pinyon Jay
Gymnorhinus cyanocephalus


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External Sites:
Cornell
USGS
Image Search
Usually observed while calling in flight.

Flocks feed in harvested corn fields or on Piñon-Juniper Hillsides

Generally in flocks of 30-70 individuals.

Distinguished from Western Scrub-jay by shorter tail and by flocking behavior.

Apodaca

Apodaca

Apodaca
Chickadees and their Allies
Bushtit
Psaltriparus minimus


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External Sites:
Cornell
USGS
Image Search
Tiny (~4in) plain gray bird.

Usually travels in groups of 10-20 individuals, constantly moving from bush to bush feeding.

Flocking birds constantly make varied twittering sounds.

Camino Lejo, Santa Fe
Thrushes and their Allies
Western Bluebird
Sialia mexicana


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External Sites:
Cornell
USGS
Image Search
Male (top photo) has blue head and red breast.

During breeding season, colors more intense than shown here.

Female (lower photo) has blue in wings, but appears gray from front with a light buffy breast.
Note white eye-ring.

El Bosque

El Bosque
Towhees
Spotted Towhee
Pipilo maculatus


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External Sites:
Cornell
USGS
Image Search
One is seldom far from a Spotted Towhee. But though they are nearby, they are usually hidden away under trees and shrubs where they toss leaves with their feet looking for insects to eat.

Occasionally you will see one at the edge of the road or briefly flying from one shrub to the next.

However, they regularly produce a contact call, a low growl.
Hear Contact Call

If you listen for that call and follow it, may be rewarded with a view of this lovely bird with a red eye.

Note white breast with rufous (reddish) flanks.

Lower Photo shows bird in its preferred habitat.

Arroyo la Mina

El Bosque Enlarge


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