río embudo birds

Learning the Birds of the Río Embudo


Less Common All-year Residents (16 Species)

Many of the species in the Common All-Year resident list are habitat generalists. They are seen over a wide range of landscapes.

The species on this Less-common Residents list are fairly common, but tend to be more specialized in their habitats.

For example, the Juniper Titmouse and Canyon Wren are sometimes seen in the agricultural land, but they are almost always seen up arroyos or on the first mesa level in the Pinyon-Juniper Woodland.

The Red-winged Blackbird ranges widely, but is most likely to be encountered in wet, marsh areas with Cattails growing. The Belted Kingfisher is rarely seen more than a few feet from the edge of the river.

If you want to see these birds, you have to go to their habitats.


English Name:
Genus species:
CommentsPhotos
Swans, Geese and Ducks
Canada Goose
Branta canadensis


Enlarge Map



External Sites:
Cornell
USGS
Image Search
Seen only on the Rio Grande.
Note white mark on Cheek.
Larger than local Ducks.
Wood Duck
Aix sponsa


Enlarge Map



External Sites:
Cornell
USGS
Image Search
Male (top): Coloration and white neck markings distinctive.



Female (middle): White Eye-patch distinctive.


Diurnal Raptors: Vultures, Eagles, Hawks and Falcons
Cooper’s Hawk
Accipiter cooperii


Enlarge Map



External Sites:
Cornell
USGS
Image Search
Adult is pictured. Note the horizontal barring on the breast and belly.
El Bosque
American Kestrel
Falco sparverius


Enlarge Map



External Sites:
Cornell
USGS
Image Search
A falcon smaller than a Robin.

Commonly seen perching on wires along roads. (Commonly seen between Velarde and Alcalde)

Note dark vertical bars on cheek.

Sometimes seen "kiting" over fields while hunting. (A kiting bird is flapping while not moving up, down or forward.)

Male is pictured.

Rinconada

Rinconada
Pigeons and Doves
Eurasian Collared-Dove
Streptopelia decaocto


Enlarge Map



External Sites:
Cornell
USGS
Image Search
White-winged Dove
Zenaida asiatica


Enlarge Map



External Sites:
Cornell
USGS
Image Search
Mourning Dove
Zenaida macroura


Enlarge Map



External Sites:
Cornell
USGS
Image Search
Generally seen flying in small groups (2-4 individuals).

Note long, pointed tail which shows white edges when landing.

Call is a soft, slow "who-AH, who, who, who" heard during the day. (Commonly mistaken for an owl. Note: Owls usually do not call during daylight hours)

El Bosque

El Bosque
Kingfishers
Belted Kingfisher
Ceryle alcyon


Enlarge Map



External Sites:
Cornell
USGS
Image Search
Perches on trees or wires near water. Hovers over water before diving for fish or crustaceans.

Gives a distinctive long, loud rattle in flight.

Male has gray breast band. Female has additional rufous band below.

El Bosque

El Bosque
Woodpeckers
Lewis’s Woodpecker
Melanerpes lewis


Enlarge Map



External Sites:
Cornell
USGS
Image Search
A distinctive red-bellied, black-backed woodpecker.

White ring on neck and throat usually visible when perched or in flight.

Only woodpecker that "hawks" insects, making looping flights to catch insects before returning to the same perch.

El Bosque
Ladder-backed Woodpecker
Picoides scalaris


Enlarge Map



External Sites:
Cornell
USGS
Image Search
Small woodpecker with distinctive black and white barring on its wings and back.

Male, with red crown, is pictured.

El Bosque
Hairy Woodpecker
Picoides villosus


Enlarge Map



External Sites:
Cornell
USGS
Image Search
Very similar to Downy Woodpecker, but larger.

Commonly distinguished by its large bill which is often as long as the bird's head from front to back.

El Bosque

El Bosque
Chickadees and their Allies
Juniper Titmouse
Baeolophus ridgwayi


Enlarge Map



External Sites:
Cornell
USGS
Image Search
Generally seen in Juniper trees, the crest on the head is distinctive.

Some of its vocalizations similar to Chickadee.

Often detected by soft woodpecker-like tapping on branches.
Wrens
Canyon Wren
Catherpes mexicanus


Enlarge Map



External Sites:
Cornell
USGS
Image Search
More often heard than seen. It's song is a very distinctive series of descending notes: tew, tew, tew, tew, tew, tew, tew.

Usually sings from rock perches high on canyon walls. Occasionally seen in riparian areas sounding its very bright, shrill, trilled "breet".

Note: White throat with rufous belly.

Near Harding Mine
Bewick’s Wren
Thryomanes bewickii


Enlarge Map



External Sites:
Cornell
USGS
Image Search
It's very prominent, white eyebrow is distinctive.

Most often seen at transition from Piñon-Juniper to agricultural or riparian areas.

Song similar to Song Sparrow, but is "buzzier" and consistently ends on a clear trill.

El Bosque
Icterids: Blackbirds, Orioles and their Allies
Red-winged Blackbird
Agelaius phoeniceus


Enlarge Map



External Sites:
Cornell
USGS
Image Search
Female (Upper Picture) has brown streaking all over.

Male (Lower Picture) is black with red patches on shoulders. Outside of breeding times, the red may be hidden.

Both sexes have medium length, very pointed bill.

Baca Park, Taos

El Bosque
Finches and Old World Sparrows
Pine Siskin
Carduelis pinus


Enlarge Map



External Sites:
Cornell
USGS
Image Search
Often mistaken for a female House Finch, this lover of Thistle and other small seeds, has a distinctively smaller, sharply pointed bill.

There is a subtle presence of yellow in the wings and at the base of the tail. The last, over saturated, photograph shows these markings.

Often gives a raspy, rising, slurred "shee".

Downtown Santa Fe

Downtown Santa Fe

El Bosque

Top of Page


Copyright 2006-2013 by Rio Embudo Birds.org --- All rights reserved.