río embudo birds

Learning the Birds of the Río Embudo


Common Winter Visitors (7 Species)

These species do not breed in the Río Embudo area. They arrive in the fall, spend the winter and then leave in the spring.

The ducks, Bald Eagle and Goldfinch breed further north.

The others are mostly altitudinal migrants that breed in New Mexico, but higher up in the mountains.


English Name:
Genus species:
CommentsPhotos
Swans, Geese and Ducks
Common Goldeneye
Bucephala clangula


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External Sites:
Cornell
USGS
Image Search
Females (upper) have brown heads.



Male (below) has dark head with distinctive white patch between the bill and the eye.

Both have yellow eye.

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Common Merganser
Mergus merganser


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External Sites:
Cornell
USGS
Image Search
Distinctive bill shape and color.

Male has dark head.

Female reddish-brown head.

Diurnal Raptors: Vultures, Eagles, Hawks and Falcons
Bald Eagle
Haliaeetus leucocephalus


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External Sites:
Cornell
USGS
Image Search
Adult: Distinctive white head and tail.

Juveniles have white in wings near body. Sometimes head brown and tail with brown band on trailing edge.
Thrushes and their Allies
Townsend’s Solitaire
Myadestes townsendi


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External Sites:
Cornell
USGS
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This bird is most often observed sitting in the tops of trees sounding a repeated, high, slow whistle.

Gray all over with white on sides of tail.

Fluttery in flight, with cream-colored bands running the length of each wing on the underside.
Sparrows and their Allies
White-crowned Sparrow
Zonotrichia leucophrys


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External Sites:
Cornell
USGS
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Adult (Upper Photo): Distinctive black and white stripes on head. Light colored bill. Clear breast and belly.

Juvenile (Lower Photo): Head stripes brown and gray.

Dark-eyed Junco
Junco hyemalis


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External Sites:
Cornell
USGS
Image Search
In winter, there are 5 sub-species of Dark-eyed Junco in our area. Many have a full black or gray hood. All have a dark eye set in dark plumage.

Almost always in flocks of 10-20 individuals. Identifiable by a very "dry" sounding "tck-tck" and by white showing on the sides of the tail, especially in flight.

Do a an Image Search (at left) to get an idea of the great variation in the plumage of this species.

Finches and Old World Sparrows
American Goldfinch
Carduelis tristis


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External Sites:
Cornell
USGS
Image Search
Female (Upper Photo)




Male (Lower Photo)

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